Less traffic on the Perimeter? It’s true, and here are the numbers.

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This was the scene on I-285 in Dunwoody over the Memorial Day weekend. The traffic volume you see on the Perimeter on an average day an improvement over 1995, according to average daily traffic counts provided by GDOT.

Believe it or not, but there’s less traffic along the north side of the Perimeter than there was 20 years ago, according to the Georgia DOT’s counts.

The map below shows the average two-way daily traffic for the years 1995, 2005 and 2014 along segments of I-285 and some of the main roads that feed it.

In every segment along I-285 between I-75 and I-85, the count for 2014 is down from 1995.

Take the segment between I-75 and Ga 400, for example. In 1995, an average of 232,000 vehicles used that part of the Perimeter daily. In 2005, that number dropped to 197,000, then rose to 215,000 in 2014, still well under the volume seen in 1995.

During the same period, the volumes on Ga 400, I-20 and I-85 on the north side of town saw increases between 30,000 and 60,000 vehicles since 1995. I-75 was different however. Its volume has decreased significantly since 2005 to levels close or below those seen in 1995.

To explore the graphic below, pull the slider at top right to select a year. Scroll over each road segment to get the average daily vehicle count. Explore more of the GDOT’s traffic counts at the GeoCounts site.

 

 

Reader Comments 0

4 comments
DonBrundage
DonBrundage

An important point not mentioned in the article was the completion of the Ga 400 extension in 1996. Thousands of cars a day switched from going I-75 and I-85 to I-285, and around to Ga 400, to going up I-85 to Ga 400, then going north on Ga 400 without using I-285.  The week that the Ga 400 extension opened, I noticed a huge drop in traffic on I-75 inside the perimeter, and on I-285 over to Ga 400.  So I am not at all surprised that I-285 traffic dropped from 1995 to 2005.

RamonMendoza
RamonMendoza

Once during a discussion of radio and TV traffic reports, I told some colleagues that they're useless to me. When asked why, I explained that if you live / commute south of I-20, then it's like you don't exist to traffic reporters.

This graphic only serves to make my point.

As far as I'm concerned anybody who moved to the north side of town had to know that they were relegating themselves to many hours of sitting in traffic. Heck, some of them even said "We don't have enough traffic...let's build a stadium right here!" If they were/are okay with it, then I'm not very sympathetic to their plight.

JEason
JEason

It would appear from the map and the text of the article that the south side has no heavy traffic. Wrong.  What we really do not have is a competent Transportation Board that works in the best interest of all the people.  We don't even rate two-way HOT lanes (another imbecility) on our stretch of I-75, just a reversible one-way HOT lane crammed into the existing right-of-way.


Atlanta is choking on the region's inane belief in cheap government. As you creep along on your daily commute, ask yourself whether your lost time has been worth the dollars you've saved for the past three decades by not paying a realistic motor fuel tax that could have modernized the road system by now.

RamonMendoza
RamonMendoza

@JEason Your point is well-taken, but in a city of five million people, it will take more than just smooth, wide roads to get us around efficiently. Until we're willing to have a serious conversation about public transit that encompasses the Metro -- all of it -- then our traffic woes will endure.